Personal Best: 2015

I’ve done my official list of the best classical and jazz recordings of 2015, and now here’s my personal one—the records that as a non-critical listener I simply enjoyed the most. That’s out of 600 or so new recordings I listened to in 2015. 600. Actually more …

There’s an arbitrary, top-12 separation, one for each month of the year, and then forty more releases to follow, which all means that I’d be glad to listen to one of these, and nothing else, for an entire week.

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Personal Best—One for Every Month

  • Charenee Wade: Offering. I am mystified why this record got so little critical attention. This is Wade’s tribute to Gil Scott-Heron, which she realizes through elegant, musical arrangements of his songs. This is affecting music with a terrific band (some of the names are Lonnie Plaxico, Dave Stryker, and Stefon Harris), perhaps the trouble with it is that no one expects Scott-Heron’s songs to be so fine and so powerful without his inimitable delivery. Well, the songs are that good, and Wade’s singing clothes their substantial force in loveliness.
  • José James: Yesterday I Had the Blues. This record grew on me. What at first seemed to be polite, slightly rote renditions of songs Billie Holiday made famous revealed iteself gradually to be a record of depth and individuality. James voice is beautiful, and his expression is subtle and plangent. Then there are Jason Moran’s scintillainting voicings underneath. A mesmerizing record that both comforts and abrades.
  • Le Berger: Music for Guitar and Patience. A barely describable of long, quietly jangling pieces for guitar with sound processing. Free to some extent, but ordered around specific explorations of space and timbre. Completely transporting and effective.
  • Hieroglyphic Being & J.I.T.U. Ahn-Sahm-Buhl: We Are Not The First. The antidote to The Epic. The strange thing for me is that after the exuberant structural and formal freedom of To Pimp a Butterfly and You’re Dead, Kamasi Washington’s album would be so aesthetically and musically staid and conservative. This recording, with contributions from Marshall Allen to Shelley Hirsch, is wild, exploratory, leaping off a platform of funk into the uncharted future of African American music. Further confirmation that Sun Ra’s The Singles is the Rossetta Stone of American vernacular music.
  • Fossil Aerosol Mining Project: The Day 1982 Contaminated 1971. No one can say who will be left to hear the voices we leave behind, but Fossil Aerosol Mining Project has, for many years now, been exploring the possible sounds of the future’s past. Enveloping, both disturbing and comforting, it’s exciting that this mysterious ensemble has returned to making new music.
  • Pyramid: A Northern Meadow. My tastes in metal are admittedly specialized: I want a solid wall of deep sound and something other than thudding four-square drumming and cookie-monster style vocals. That’s surprisingly difficult to find, but this superb record checks all the boxes, and does so much more.

https://bandcamp.com/EmbeddedPlayer/album=462904211/size=small/bgcol=ffffff/linkcol=0687f5/track=2219665286/transparent=true/

  • C. Duncan: Architect. One of the most sheerly beautiful pop records I have ever heard. Duncan’s song-craft and production are excellent, and his musical phrasing and vocal timbre are gorgeous. You can get the CD or LP soon from Amazon, or get the digital now at Bandcamp.
  • Kill West: Smoke Beach. Something like Pyramids, but different; psychadelic drone-rock from Brazil, with a darkly warm shoegazy sound, insinuating vocals, and a real groove on every track.
  • Jon Mueller: A Magnetic Center. Experimentation that is impossible to pigeon-hole and is exciting. Mueller’s record is made with nothing more than percussion and his own voice. He produces a multi-tracked glossolalia that, combined with the mesmerizing, repetitive beats, creates the feeling of an ancient ritual buried deep within the mind. Odd, abstract, and obsessive in the first few minutes, the experience becomes deep, stunning, and transformative.

https://bandcamp.com/EmbeddedPlayer/album=2875186250/size=small/bgcol=ffffff/linkcol=0687f5/track=3138450192/transparent=true/

  • Alessandro Cortini: Risveglio. The development of cheap, powerful CPUs has produced a parallel development of powerful music and sound production software. Cortini, one of the most interesting contemporary electronic musicians, instead used what are now vintage pieces of hardware—the Roland 202 monophonic synthesizer/sequencer, and TB303 bass synthesizer/sequencer, combined with a delay. As with all great music, what is seemingly a limitation turns out to be a vast resource of imagination.
  • Aine O’Dwyer: Music for Church Cleaners Vol. I and II. A series of serene and expressive organ improvisations, made after-hours in the presence of the women cleaning the churches. O’Dwyer’s playing seeks its own statement while she also accepts the requests of her accidental audiences to not, for example, “stay on one note for a long time.” The music is lovely on its own, and the atmosphere gives it a unique frisson of live performance.
  • Brian Harnetty: Rawhead & Bloodybones. Not the usual archival release from Dust-to-Digital, but new music from composer Harnetty. He combines samples of music and spoken audio from both the Berea College Appalachian Sound Archives and the Sun Ra/El Saturn Creative Audio Archive, and to the prerecorded music he adds original, acoustic touches. This is a dialogue between past and present, memory and action, grisly, strange, and compelling.

https://bandcamp.com/EmbeddedPlayer/album=3328528751/size=small/bgcol=ffffff/linkcol=0687f5/track=1931696979/transparent=true/

Remember, if you order by clicking the links, you help support this site

Personal Best—Music for Every Week

  • Adoption Tapes: Walks on the Beach.
  • Aidan Baker: Ecpliptic Plane.
  • SONAR: Black Light.
  • High aura’d & Mike Shiflet: Awake.
  • Lucia Roberts: I’m Just Dreaming.
  • Chris Pitsiokos Trio: Gordian Twine.
  • Craw: 1993-1997.
  • Kristoffer Oustad: Filth Haven.
  • Kate Carr, I had myself a nuclear spring.
  • Makaya McCraven: In the Moment.
  • Stephan Mathieu: Before Nostromo.
  • David Torn: Only Sky.
  • Steve Roach: Skeleton Keys.
  • Anouar Brahem: Souvenance.
  • Patrick Higgins: Bachanalia.
  • Steve M. Miller: Between Noise and Silence.
  • Tim Coster: Where to Be – Vol. 1.
  • Various Artists: Excavated Shellac: Reeds.
  • Laddio Bolocko: Live and Unreleased 1997-2000.
  • Andrew Weathers Ensemble: Fuck Everybody, You Can Do Anything.
  • Premature Burial: The Conjuring.
  • William Ryan Fritch: Revisionist.
  • Maxfield Gast: Ogopogo.
  • Wume: Maintain.
  • Dommengang: Everybody’s Boogie.
  • Kreasi Gong Kebyar: ASTI-Denpassar-Bali.
  • pjs: Harvest.
  • Head Dress: Recordings for Ensoniq Fizmo Vol. 1.
  • Boduf Songs: Stench of Exist.
  • Bill Seaman: f (noir).
  • Rafael Anton Irissari: A Fragile Geography.
  • 300 Basses: Tria Atoma.
  • BOAN: Mentiras.
  • Kim Cass: Kim Cass.
  • Andrew Bernstein: Cult Appeal.
  • William Basinksi & Richard Chartier: Divertissement.
  • Josh Mason: Alone in the Kingdom.
  • Mogador: Overflow Pool.
  • Schnellertollermeier: X.
  • The Sebastians: Night Scenes from the Ospedale.

 

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