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Music The Classical Tradition

So Much Music, So Much Time

There is so much streaming music, live and archived, now available that it’s getting close to the experience of being in New York City and trying to make impossible choices over what to see and what to sacrifice.

There is so much streaming music, live and archived, now available that it’s getting close to the experience of being in New York City and trying to make impossible choices over what to see and what to sacrifice. It feels to me like an over-saturated landscape, not much of a complaint to be sure considering that the only way to catch live music right now if from the confines of your own home. Here’s upcoming and regular things that I would turn on:

  • Cellist Jan Vogler has announced “Music Never Sleeps NYC,” a 24-hour live streaming music marathon that begins 6pm EST, Friday, March 27. There’s a current list of musicians, with the promise that more will be added; Adele Anthony, Inon Barnatan, Alessio Bax,the Brentano Quartet, Anthony Roth Costanzo, Jeremy Denk, Bela Fleck,The Knights, Tessa Lark,, Midori, Nico Muhly, Aoife O’Donovan, Sandbox Percussion, Gil Shaham, Arnaud Sussman, et al. He assures that “social distancing will be strictly observed” and that NYC charitable causes will be announced during the marathon.
  • I’m feeling the personal loss of the Orchestra of the S.E.M. Ensemble’s April 1 50th anniversary concert, something I was keenly anticipating. In it’s place, the ensemble will upload an audio/visual mosaic concert, stitching together something of their grand history through archived performances. The “concert” will be uploaded to their website at 1pm EST, April 1, the program will be Small Orchestra Piece by Christian Wolff, Robert Ashley’s The Mystery of the RiverStates of Being, States of Becoming from Miya Masaoka, and Julius Eastman’s Joy Boy, so pretty much rickin’.
  • Carmoor has been live streaming since the New York Festival of Song performance in the middle of March was closed to audiences. Next on their schedule is a solo performance from Vijay Iyer, April 4, 8 EST, with the Aaron Diehl Trio April 18, and Conrad Tao April 26, 3 pm.
  • Cellist Alisa Weilerstein is covering the Bach Cello Suites over 36 on Facebook, playing and discussing the works movement by movement.
  • Over the next four Saturdays (March 28, April 4, 11, and 18), the International Contemporary Ensemble and Music on the Rebound will present The World Wide Tuning Meditation, a global performance of Pauline Oliveros’ Tuning Meditation. This is something you can take part in (it will be managed over Zoom), because Oliveros’ score is for anyone and everyone:
  1. Begin by taking a deep breath and letting it all the way out with air sound. Listen with your mind’s ear for a tone.
  2. On the next breath using any vowel sound, sing the tone that you have silently perceived on one comfortable breath. Listen to the whole field of sound the group is making.
  3. Select a voice distant from you and tune as exactly as possible to the tone you are hearing from that voice. Listen again to the whole field of sound the group is making.
  4. Contribute by singing a new tone that no one else is singing. Continue by listening then singing a tone of your own or tuning to the tone of another voice alternately.

Here’s the link for information.

Let’s hear it for the generosity of these musicians.

By gtra1n

I'm a writer and editor here (musician otherwise), with bylines in The Wire, Down Beat, New York Classical Review, VAN, Music & Literature, Grove Dictionary of American Music, Signal to Noise, and many others. I'm also the Music Editor at the Brooklyn Rail. Contact me for any of your word needs.

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