2016 Classical Releases—The Last Word

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In the course of a year, I listen to more jazz on record and hear more classical music in the concert hall. That’s a matter of circumstances; I would prefer that were reversed, but there are few opportunities for me to write about live jazz, and jazz venues are generally unwelcoming to the those without prestige credentials.. The New York Classical Review, or the other hand, gives me the opportunity to cover classical music performances, and before I started writing there, classical music venues were always been open to me as an independent critic.

This is the context for my relationship with recordings. While I’d prefer to get more of my jazz live, recordings are necessary to hear new musicians, and hear what players who aren’t getting gigs are doing.

For classical music, recordings can be puzzling. For new music, recordings are a logical and necessary means to document expansion of the tradition—likewise recordings of obscure but worthwhile music (there is still a lot of stuff like that from the Renaissance and Baroque eras). But for the standard repertoire, it’s often unclear why recordings are made. Do we need more recordings of the Beethoven symphonies, more Chopin Preludes, more Vivaldi Concertos? No, we do it. But we get them anyway.

This is the staple of the last vestiges of the big record labels, like Deutsche Gramophone sign a new a star performer and put them through the cycle of recording all the appropriate standard works. It makes sense for unique talents like Daniil Trifonov, who has many new ideas about older pieces. It makes less sense for even spectacular talents like Yuja Wang, who gives music unbelievable life in concert, but is it not rethinking anything. For solid but unsurprising musicians like Yannick Nézet-Séquin, it makes no sense.

This is because classical music, despite common perceptions, is a living art. Like plays from the past, the art needs to be performed and experienced in the moment. The sense of occasion, community, and time in the concert hall is entirely different than in the living room, and music is also made an entirely different way in the recording studio. Nézet-Séquin, at his best, leads performances that are exemplary renditions of what’s on the page. At his best, this makes for another fine recording. but the classical music discography general is clogged with fine recordings, and reissues are the best recordings from the past are plentiful and cheap.

So again, why make these, and why listen to them? Because Trifonov appears to be a musician of historical greatness, and it is exciting to witness him discovering his own thoughts about the tradition. Same is true for Murray Perahia’s CD of Bach’s French Suites-not only is his playing superb but his thinking is fresh (this recording was made for Sony as part of Perahia’s exploration of Bach, but the label dropped him without release it, and DG picked it up).

But even with exciting musicians like Trifonov and Igor Levitt, most of what comes from the big labels is exactly what you expect: more Brahms, more collections of arias, more cross-overs. Classical music is where the independent labels are more interesting, and more important, than in any other genre. Here are my continuing favorites with their best releases from 2016 and early 2017.

Harmonia Mundi is the home for some of the finest musicians in classical music and well-chosen repertory. This is where you’ll find recordings of Monteverdi’s and Mozart’s operas and Bach’s Passions, led by René Jacobs, that are among the finest and most important ever made and that should be part of your music library. The label is also where you’ll hear the fresh intelligence of musicians like fortepianist Kristian Bezuidenhout, violinist Isabelle Faust, pianist Alexander Melnikov, baritone Matthias Goerne, harpsichordist Richard Egarr, the Jerusalem String Quartet, and cellist Jean-Guihen Queyras. They put out a substantial number of period performance practice recordings, and also the beautiful contemporary choral music of Craig Hella Johnson. Here are some of the finest recent releases:

Bridge, founded by guitarist David Starobin, maintains a catalogue of under-represented common practice period composers, and specialized in comprehensive series from modern and contemporary composers. The most important of these is their recordings of music by Stefan Wolpe. Wolpe’s music comes out of early 20th century European modernism, but is really unclassifiable. He could write atonally, he could use popular music, theatrical elements, pretty much anything. His work is imaginative, expressive, made with refined, strong structures, and full of surprises. He was one of the finest composers of the 20th century, and had an important influence as a teacher once he emigrated to America. Other recommended series and 2016 releases:

ECM, while not originally a classical label, has now pioneered a new music style that is predominantly tonal, and mixes pre-baroque, minimalism, and improvisation, either as a collection or as a synthesis. And through contemporary composers like Steve Reich, Meredith Monk, and Arvo Pärt, they’ve used their New Series to explore both modern and common practice period repertory. While the results have been inconsistent—there’s some recordings of 19th and early 20th century music that are surprisingly poor, while Andras Schiff’s Beethoven Piano Sonatas cycle is full of fascinating thinking and draws one back again and again, and Gidon Kremer’s two collections of music by Mieczyslaw Weinberg have made an extraordinarily strong case for the composer—the label has completely filled the classical music niche that Nonesuch used to fill, and continues to expand in both the standard repertory and such extra-classical composed music as by Anouar Brahem and Tigran Mansurayn.

Winter & Winter is an addendum, but worth noting. Their classical releases are few but extremely well-chosen. They’ve produced interesting, but non-essential, recordings of modern and avant-garde music played by accordionist Teodoro Anzelotti, but of late have become the home for two major artists, Barbara Hannigan and Hans Abrahamsen. Their two Abrahamsen releases, Schnee and let me tell you, and Hannigan’s recording of Satie’s Socrate are must-haves.

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Summer Birthdays

They’re a little odd. My daughter has one, and since she’s growing up in Brooklyn, is white and nominally middle-class (if only she knew!), a lot of her friends from the neighborhood and pre-k just aren’t around to come to her parties.

Irritable Hedgehog record label has a summer birthday too, turning five in coincidence with my little girl. In those few years they have produced a concentrated and important discography of musical thinking at the edge of the post-minimalist scene. A subjective and probably wildly inaccurate way to describe their aesthetic is that they favor concentration and space, which means they record music that can have a lot of repetition, a lot of quiet, or both. And more.

They are celebrating generously, reducing the price of their CDs from $12 to $10 and offering a 25% discount for the month of July. Go to their bandcamp page and use the code “happyfifth” to get the deal. Highly recommended are their four Wandelweiser discs, the revelatory reconstruction of Dennis Johnson’s November, Dave Seidel’s marvelous ~60 Hz, and a new recording from pianist R. Andrew Lee (read my review of his recent recital at Spectrum) playing as if to each other, composed by Jay Batzner. This is music that walks a fine line between contemplation and tense insistence, stimulating to the mind and attractive to the ear. And with the sale, you can have it for $3. Excuse me while I pick up that Eva-Maria Houben recording that’s been in my wish list …

Another excellent record label is also having a sale, David Starobin’s [Bridge](http://bridgerecords.com) records. Bridge has a good selection of music from the Western classical tradition, but where it is outstanding is in the ongoing world of post-WWII modernism, with multi-volume series of music from [Elliott Carter](http://bridgerecords.com/collections/catalog-all/elliott-carter), [George Crumb](http://bridgerecords.com/collections/catalog-all/george-crumb), [Poul Ruders](http://bridgerecords.com/collections/catalog-all/poul-ruders), George Perle, [Paul Lansky](http://bridgerecords.com/collections/catalog-all/paul-lansky) (electronic and acoustic), and many more. They also feature musicians who are the finest in their fields, like [Gil Kalish](http://bridgerecords.com/collections/catalog-all/gilbert-kalish), [Aleck Karis](http://bridgerecords.com/collections/catalog-all/aleck-karis), the late, great [Jan DeGaetani](http://bridgerecords.com/collections/catalog-all/jan-degaetani), and others. I want to particularly [highlight](http://bridgerecords.com/collections/catalog-all/products/9215) [recordings](http://bridgerecords.com/collections/catalog-all/products/9344) of the [music](http://bridgerecords.com/collections/catalog-all/products/9116) of [Stefan Wolpe](http://bridgerecords.com/collections/catalog-all/stefan-wolpe). Wolpe is a composer more often heard of than heard, but I’ve been fortunate to hear some of his [finest](http://newyorkclassicalreview.com/2014/12/wolpe-and-feldman-together-again-in-rewarding-nynme-program/) [works](http://newyorkclassicalreview.com/2015/06/pianist-holzman-brings-skill-and-personal-insight-to-music-of-our-time/) over the past six months, and his music is brilliant and profound. Get 15% off of these CDs, and the entire Bridge catalog, with the code: SUMMEROFBRIDGE.