Bruckner Time

Tonight, Daniel Barenboim and the Staatskapelle Berlin bring the first performance cycle in American history to Carnegie Hall (I’ll be reviewing tonight’s concert, and Symphony Nos. 5 and 9 for the New York Classical Review). Bruckner is a major symphonic composer, and in the eyes of some the greatest symphonist. That may see a bizarre … Continue reading Bruckner Time

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Keepin' It Real

Links and Lists: You've read my Jazz Critics Poll ballot, now find the final, tabulated results here, results in all categorieshere, the list of individual ballotshere, and the top 10 essay from Francis Davis, the head mofo in charge. Daniel Barenboim's new recording of the Beethoven symphonies with the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra was one of … Continue reading Keepin' It Real

April Playlist

Recommended recordings, new and old: http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?lt1=_blank&bc1=000000&IS2=1&bg1=FFFFFF&fc1=000000&lc1=0000FF&t=thbicibl-20&o=1&p=8&l=as4&m=amazon&f=ifr&ref=ss_til&asins=B007BGU65U Jerome Sabbagh, Plugged In, on the Bee Jazz label, is packed full of great thinking and playing, it touches on many styles but subverts them all into the Sabbagh's overall conception, which has grown in both focus and expansiveness. Jozef Dumoulin's keyboard work, from both the hard-bop tradition and … Continue reading April Playlist

Mahler 4 & 5

The Mahler cycle continues tonight, with Boulez leading the Sixth. Yesterday was a refreshing break, after concerts of the 4th and 5th symphonies over the weekend. Saturday night it was Boulez leading selections from the Wunderhorn songs and the 4th, with Dorothea Roschmann back singing. The songs were nicely done, but I find excerpts from … Continue reading Mahler 4 & 5

Mahler 4 & 5

The Mahler cycle continues tonight, with Boulez leading the Sixth. Yesterday was a refreshing break, after concerts of the 4th and 5th symphonies over the weekend. Saturday night it was Boulez leading selections from the Wunderhorn songs and the 4th, with Dorothea Roschmann back singing. The songs were nicely done, but I find excerpts from … Continue reading Mahler 4 & 5

Mahler 1

Last night's sequential Mahler cycle started not only with the Symphony No. 1 but with his Kindertotenlieder, sung by Thomas Quasthoff. It was surprisingly flat - Quasthoff sang with surprising emphasis and vehemence, which I think is a wrong choice in this music, which is best performed with understatement. The poetry itself only refers to … Continue reading Mahler 1